All posts by Rebecca Anderson

Final patient enrolled in Creavo and University of Warwick MCG study

Creavo Medical Technologies (Creavo) is pleased to announce the enrolment of the last patient in a study led by the cardiology team at the South Warwickshire NHS Foundation Trust.

The study will assess if Creavo’s magnetocardiography (MCG) device can differentiate between the hearts of those who have previously suffered from a cardiac event such as a myocardial infarction (MI), and hearts of healthy (non-ischaemic) patients.

Approximately 100 patients have been enrolled throughout the study (50 healthy and 50 post-cardiac event), and the results are intended to determine if MCG can detect damage in the hearts of those patients with a recently confirmed MI.

Dr Roger Beadle, Consultant Cardiologist at the University of Warwick said: “The research team at South Warwickshire NHS Foundation are excited to be a part of this MCG project. Bringing a new technology into a hospital is a great opportunity.

“The use of MCG in the field of acute coronary syndromes is well documented but the possibilities for this technology extend far beyond that. We hope that this piece of research will be our first step in exploring this.”

Steve Parker, Chief Executive Officer of Creavo Medical Technologies said: “While we continue to carry out research with MCG in the emergency department, this is our initial step into how Creavo’s unique MCG technology adds value and can be utilised in the cardiology setting. The aim is to provide physicians with an accurate ischaemic condition of the heart, helping them decide on the most appropriate care pathway for the patient.

“We are delighted to be working alongside Dr Beadle and his team for this study and thank them for their support. We look forward to working with further patients, and to obtaining results which are expected shortly.”

Creavo launches largest US study of its kind

A new cardiac diagnostic device aimed at helping physicians rule out active ischemia in patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with chest pain is being trialled at five of the most respected research facilities in the United States (Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; Baylor University, Houston, TX; Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN; University of Cincinnati, OH; and Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC).

The device, developed by Creavo Medical Technologies Ltd (Creavo) a UK-based privately-held medical device company, is a mobile medical magnetometer which can be used at a patient’s bedside to measure and report electromagnetic fluctuations caused by heart activity.

Approximately 720 patients will be enrolled throughout the trial, which is the largest magnetocardiography (MCG) trial ever to take place in the United States and is scheduled to be completed by mid-2019.

Gregory J. Fermann, MD, Professor, Executive Vice Chairman and Director of the Clinical Trials Centre at the University of Cincinnati said: “Each year, 8 to 10 million patients complaining of chest pain present to an emergency department (ED) in the United States”.  Dr. Fermann serves as the US Chief Investigator for the MAGNET ACS-US (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT 03546933) trial which is being coordinated at the University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA.

“The ability to quickly risk stratify and safely discharge ED patients presenting with symptoms consistent with chest pain of cardiac origin is critically important to the overall flow of patients through crowded Emergency Departments. This device has the potential to become an essential tool in the rapid evaluation of these patients.”

“On behalf of the entire MAGNET ACS-US investigative team, I am excited to report that we are open to recruitment of Emergency Department (ED) patients.”

Steve Parker, Chief Executive Officer at Creavo said: “Our device has the potential to tackle a global unmet need. Non-ischemic chest pain patients place a huge strain on emergency departments as the current rule-out triage process of electrocardiograms and blood biomarker tests can take a number of hours. Our device is designed to rapidly aid physicians with the decision to rule out acute coronary syndrome by performing a non-invasive five-minute scan, freeing up resources and bed space.

“We’ve conducted extensive research into the use of MCG in UK emergency departments and are pleased to be taking our research further afield into the US.”

Commenting on the technology behind the device, Professor Ben Varcoe, Chief Scientific Officer at Creavo said: “MCG technology has been used in medical research since the 1960s, but historically it has been restricted to larger immobile SQUID devices which aren’t practical for emergency medical settings. Our device can be deployed directly at the patient’s bedside and uses MCG to detect abnormal patterns in the magnetic fields of the heart.”

There have been several notable achievements for Creavo in the last two years. The device received CE mark registration in Europe in November 2016 and secured 510(k) clearance as a device that measures and displays magnetic signals generated by the heart from the US Food and Drug Administration in October 2017. Following initial funding, the company raised £13.4m ($17m) in private equity funding in July 2017. The round was oversubscribed and exceeded Creavo’s funding target, reflecting strong investor support and endorsement of the company’s strategy and team.

Creavo equipment in the UC Emergency Department with Dr. Gregory Fermann.

Celebrating with the NHS – 70 years of life-saving medical developments

It all began in 1948 when Aneurin Bevan established the National Health Service based on the premise that good healthcare should be available to all, regardless of wealth. 70 years on and the NHS sees almost 1.5 million patients every day in England alone.  It has provided an incredible platform for the UK’s scientific community to test and evaluate breakthrough treatments, innovative medical research and advance technologies. Having trialled countless new drugs, medical devices and procedures, the UK’s health service has saved lives and changed the world. Without the NHS, many clinical and technological innovations would not have received backing; holding back numerous ground-breaking advancements in medical diagnostics and treatments.

To mark the NHS’s 70th birthday, we remember some of the greatest medical breakthroughs that the health service uses to this day to save lives:

  1. DNA – In 1953, James D Watson and Francis Crick, two Cambridge University scientists, described the structure of a chemical called deoxyribonucleic acid in Nature magazine. They believed the “structure had novel features which are of considerable biological interest” and this foundational discovery has transformed medicine. We now know that DNA makes up genes, which pass hereditary characteristics from parent to child. Knowing the structure of DNA has enabled scientists to understand, identify and treat many inherited diseases.
  1. Vaccination programmes – in the early years of the NHS, tuberculosis, measles, mumps and polio were common. In 1958 – a polio and diphtheria vaccination programme was launched. Prior to the programme, there were up to 8,000 cases of polio per year, and as many as 70,000 cases of diphtheria, leading to 5,000 deaths. The programme ensured everyone under the age of 15 was vaccinated and led to an immediate and dramatic reduction of both diseases. Following this success, 1963 saw the introduction of a vaccine for measles.
  1. Organ transplants – in 1960, the first UK kidney transplant took place involving an identical set of 49-year-old twins. The procedure was a success, with donor and recipient living for a further six years before they both died of unrelated illness. In 1968 – Britain’s first heart transplant was carried out and in 1987 the NHS delivered the world’s first liver, heart and lung transplant.
  1. Beta blockers – in 1964, James Black synthesised the first clinically significant beta blockers—propranolol and pronethalol. They revolutionised the medical management of angina and are considered to be one of the most important contributions to clinical medicine and pharmacology of the 20th century. Today more than 37 million prescriptions are written for these drugs annually to treat a wide range of cardiovascular disorders.
  1. Scanning technology – in the 1970s two revolutionary technologies were introduced to the NHS – Computerised tomography (CT) scans and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners. Both technologies provide detailed images of the body’s internal cavities and organs to aid in the identification and diagnosis of disease states such as cancer, complex tumours, multiple sclerosis or damage following a stroke.
  1. Keyhole surgery– in the 1980s, surgeons introduced keyhole surgery to the NHS and used it in an operation to remove a gallbladder. A thin telescopic rod is lit with a fibre-optic cable that is connected to a tiny camera, which transmits images to a monitor. It means that surgery that would once have required large incisions and put the patient at greater risk of infection is now far less invasive and safer for patients.
  1. Gene therapy – in 2002, the first successful delivery of gene therapy was carried out at Great Ormond Street Hospital, London, curing an 18-month-old child of “bubble boy” disease (severe combined immunodeficiency, or SCID). Although a relatively new technique, it has the potential to treat some genetically related diseases at their roots.  Understanding a patient’s genetic make-up means that doctor’s will be able to intervene appropriately and be better able to predict the development of a disease.

As we enter the next few years of the NHS the future is predicted to see a continuing evolution of pioneering treatments and break-through medical technologies.  At Creavo, we are looking forward to playing an active role in making a significant difference in shaping the way healthcare is delivered and look forward to the progress, the ne

Creavo attends RCP annual conference

Event marks Royal College of Physicians’ 500th anniversary – celebrating innovation in medicine.

Creavo Medical Technologies (Creavo) will be exhibiting at the Royal College of Physicians’ (RCP) annual conference: Innovation in Medicine 2018 – one of the UK’s most anticipated medical events of year.  The packed schedule includes presentations from over 90 leading international experts, exploring the latest developments in healthcare, innovation practice and digital health.

June’s event carries extra significance, as the RCP marks its 500-year anniversary, which it will be celebrating with a series of events throughout the summer.

Creavo will be exhibiting at the event with its innovative magnetocardiography (MCG) device, designed to help rule out ischaemia-related heart problems within emergency departments. The device performs a non-invasive scan within minutes at the patient’s bedside and can potentially reduce patient anxiety and save hospitals valuable time, resources and bed space. Financially, the device has the potential to save the UK healthcare system up to £200 million a year.

Steve Parker, Chief Executive Officer at Creavo, said: “The Royal College of Physicians has been championing innovation in medicine for 500 years, and we’re very proud to take part in an event that celebrates this milestone for them.”

Please visit us at stand 26 to learn more about Creavo and our product.

Creavo begins 60 patient Brugada syndrome study at St George’s, University of London

Creavo Medical Technologies (Creavo) is pleased to announce the start of a new study at St George’s, University of London, led by Dr Elijah Behr.

The study will assess if Creavo’s magnetocardiography (MCG) device can identify Brugada syndrome (BrS) in patients, then use this information to classify a group at risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD).

Approximately 60 patients will be enrolled throughout the study, which is scheduled to be completed in the October timeframe.

Dr Behr, who is a Reader in Cardiovascular Medicine at St George’s University of London and consultant cardiologist at London’s St George’s Hospital, is a renowned specialist in the field of arrhythmias and SCD. He said: “This trial is one of the first to assess the potential use of MCG to identify patients at greater risk of sudden cardiac death. Only by exploring new technologies can we work to improve outcomes for patients, and we are very pleased to be undertaking this project.”

Steve Parker, Chief Executive Officer at Creavo said: “There is extensive research into the use of MCG to accurately rule out acute coronary syndrome in chest pain patients in an A&E setting, but this new study will help assess the potential for the device to be used as a screening tool outside of emergency care. This is an important step in our journey, and we thank the team at St George’s University for their involvement and support.”

St George’s is also involved in a separate multi-site study that is being conducted in the emergency department of several major UK hospitals located in Sheffield, Nottingham, Bristol and Leicester.  That study will assess the effectiveness of Creavo’s device in aiding physicians identify patients at low risk of ischaemic heart disease.

There have been a number of notable achievements for Creavo in the last two years. The device received EC certification for CE marking in Europe in November 2016 and secured 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in October 2017. Following initial funding for its MCG device, the company raised an additional £13.4m ($17m) in July 2017 from private equity investors. The round was oversubscribed and exceeded Creavo’s target, reflecting strong investor support and endorsement of the company’s strategy and team.

Creavo enrolls final patient in largest magnetocardiography (MCG) trial of its kind

Trial tests the viability of Creavo’s MCG device at five major emergency departments across the UK.

Creavo Medical Technologies (Creavo), the UK-based medical device company, has completed patient enrollment in its multi-centre study.   Involving 750 patients across five of the UK’s largest emergency departments — Sheffield, Nottingham, Bristol, Leicester and London’s St George’s — the study has been conducted to assess the accuracy of Creavo’s  magnetocardiography (MCG) device in identifying those at low risk of ischaemic heart disease.

Lead investigator Prof Steve Goodacre commented,” The study is entering an exciting phase, in which we will analyse the data to determine the accuracy of the MCG device for aiding the diagnosing of ischaemic heart disease”

The device, which performs a non-invasive scan within minutes at the patient’s bedside, has been designed to aid clinicians meet a clinical need, to quickly rule out ischaemia related heart problems at the point of admission to emergency departments. Identifying these patients early can potentially reduce patient anxiety and can save the hospitals valuable time, resources and bed space. Financially, the device has the potential to save the UK healthcare system up to £200 million a year.

Steve Parker, Chief Executive Officer at Creavo said: “Finalising this important study is a major milestone for Creavo as we work towards our goal of offering rapid diagnostic solutions that improve patient outcomes and meet the needs of healthcare professionals. This study will give us important information and I’d like to thank the experienced healthcare professionals and patients who have supported and participated to make this trial possible.  Feedback from the users has been positive and we’re looking forward to releasing the results in due course.”

There have been a number of notable achievements for Creavo in the last two years.  The device received CE mark registration in Europe in November 2016 and secured 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in October 2017.   Following initial funding, the company raised £13.4m ($17m) in additional private equity funding in July 2017 for its MCG device. The round was oversubscribed and exceeded Creavo’s funding target, reflecting strong investor support and endorsement of the company’s strategy and team.

 

Creavo appoints distinguished medical technology Chiefs to its Board

Chris Meredith and Pierre Chauvineau bring a wealth of experience to the growing business

 Creavo Medical Technologies (Creavo), the UK-based medical device company has appointed senior medical technology industry leaders Chris Meredith and Pierre Chauvineau as non-executive directors.

The new members of the company’s expanded board will provide ongoing guidance and governance as Creavo continues to work towards full commercialisation of its portable magnetocardiography (MCG) device.

Chris Meredith is currently Group Chief Executive Officer of Advanced Medical Solutions Group plc and has previously held senior sales and marketing roles at Smiths Industries – now Smiths Group plc, Cardinal Health, Banner Pharmacaps, and Aster Cephac. His experience covers contract manufacturing, product development, clinical research and branded product sales, all within the medical device, pharmaceutical or consumer healthcare markets.

Pierre Chauvineau has over 25 years’ international business leadership experience in corporate and start-up companies within the medical technology industry. He recently held the role of Vice President and General Manager Rhythm Management Europe at medical device manufacturer Boston Scientific. He was also Vice President and General Manager International for Cameron Health, a medical technology business – later acquired by Boston Scientific – which developed a novel cardiac defibrillator. He has also held a variety of senior roles in the cardiac rhythm management division of medical technology firm Medtronic.

Robert Barr, Chairman of Creavo commented “We are delighted to welcome both Chris and Pierre to the board at this important time as we move towards full commercialisation. Their complementary skills and experience in developing world class medical device businesses and launching disruptive technologies in the cardiology space will add significant value as we move into the next phase of Creavo’s evolution.”

 In emergency medicine, Creavo’s technology is designed to meet an urgent clinical need, to help physicians quickly rule out serious heart-related problems at the point of admission to emergency departments. Identifying these patients early reduces patient anxiety and can save the hospitals valuable time, resources and bed space. Financially, the device has the potential to save the UK healthcare system alone up to £200 million a year.

Following initial funding, the company raised £13.4m ($17m) in private equity funding in July 2017 for its MCG device. The round was oversubscribed and exceeded Creavo’s funding target, reflecting strong investor support and endorsement of the company’s strategy and team.